Repeal Medicare limits on therapy

Congress has failed to ensure medically necessary therapy visits for Medicare recipients, forcing many seniors to pay for these vital services out-of-pocket. Now those requiring physical, occupational or speech therapy are facing strict and unfair limits in the number of times they can see therapists under Medicare coverage.

http://www.stargazette.com/story/opinion/readers/2018/02/03/letters-views-national-issues/110058146/

Posted by editor on Tue, 06 Feb 2018 11:02 | Permalink

How Amazon Could Take On Home Care

Amazon (NYSE: AMZN) is entering the health care market, and its momentum could carry the retail giant into the home care space.

Watching Amazon’s actions and guessing at next steps has become a spectator sport, and as the home health care space is in the midst of a major consolidation period, industry players are looking for opportunities to both benefit from Amazon and defend from potential competition.

https://homehealthcarenews.com/2018/01/how-amazon-could-take-on-home-care/#.WmehWQVfJgM.email

Posted by editor on Wed, 31 Jan 2018 11:01 | Permalink

Fighting Social Isolation: A View from the Trenches

It is a sad paradox that the technology revolution which has done so much to connect the world has in many ways been a source of increasing alienation and isolation for senior citizens. More than 25 years after the invention of the World Wide Web, one-third of Americans over the age of 65 report never using the Internet, and half lack a home broadband connection. This translates into more than 15 million older adults who can’t use email, follow a family member on Facebook, or search for local events online. Information and communications technologies are a lifeline for the socially disconnected, and programs that engage and train older adults in using these tools are on the front lines of efforts to overcome the epidemic of social isolation among senior citizens.

https://academic.oup.com/ppar/article/27/4/149/4774076?guestAccessKey=bb754da7-256e-454b-84ef-236150f92fef

Posted by editor on Wed, 31 Jan 2018 11:01 | Permalink

What age is considered "old" nowadays?

"Old" people are getting older. While this might seem obvious, a statistical perspective provides interesting insights into living and working in today's longevity revolution.

Research from John Shoven, a prominent economics professor at Stanford University, suggests that if your chance of dying within the next year is 1 percent or less, you might be considered "middle aged." The chart below shows that the threshold for men transitioning beyond middle age increased from about age 44 in the 1920s to about 60 today.

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/what-age-is-considered-old-nowadays/

Posted by editor on Fri, 26 Jan 2018 09:01 | Permalink

The city that solved homelessness

Construction is everywhere. The economy is booming. And yet Seattle’s homeless problem continues to grow. If we can’t even make progress in good times, the odds would seem to be against real solutions.

But there is one city that seems to have it figured out: Vienna.

European cities, in general, do much better than North America in providing housing. The Austrian capital, though, has had unusual success with housing issues that dog metro areas in the Pacific Northwest.

Vienna offers a vision of a city that doesn’t shove long-time residents to neighboring communities, accommodates a range of incomes, and actually has enough affordable housing that the homeless problem is solved.

http://crosscut.com/2017/06/homelessness-housing-crisis-seattle-vienna-solution/

Posted by editor on Fri, 26 Jan 2018 09:01 | Permalink

Good Friends Might Be Your Best Brain Booster As You Age

Ask Edith Smith, a proud 103-year-old, about her friends, and she’ll give you an earful.

There’s Johnetta, 101, whom she’s known for 70 years and who has Alzheimer’s disease. “I call her every day and just say ‘Hi, how are you doing?’ She never knows, but she says hi back, and I tease her,” Smith said.

There’s Katie, 93, whom Smith met during a long teaching career with the Chicago Public Schools. “Every day we have a good conversation. She’s still driving and lives in her own house, and she tells me what’s going on.”

Then there’s Rhea, 90, whom Smith visits regularly at a retirement facility. And Mary, 95, who doesn’t leave her house anymore, “so I fix her a basket about once a month of jelly and little things I make and send it over by cab.” And fellow residents at Smith’s Chicago senior community, whom she recognizes with a card and a treat on their birthdays.

 “I’m a very friendly person,” Smith said, when asked to describe herself.

That may be one reason why this lively centenarian has an extraordinary memory for someone her age, suggests a recent study by researchers at Northwestern University highlighting a notable link between brain health and positive relationships.

https://khn.org/news/good-friends-might-be-your-best-brain-booster-as-you-age/

Posted by editor on Fri, 26 Jan 2018 09:01 | Permalink

Robot CATS to be used to help elderly people with tasks and reminders

The US project, dubbed ARIES - Affordable Robotic Intelligence for Elderly Support – aims to develop artificially intelligent cats and dogs that can aid older people.

A toy company has been granted money to develop robotic cats for the elderly which can help with tasks and reminders.

Toy giant Hasbro and the prestigious Brown University, Rhode Island, have secured a $1m science grant to fund research and development to add artificial intelligence features to their 'Joy for All' pets.

The US project, dubbed ARIES - Affordable Robotic Intelligence for Elderly Support – aims to develop artificially intelligent cats and dogs that can aid older people, people with mild dementia remember what they otherwise might forget.

https://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/robot-cats-used-help-elderly-11725043

Posted by editor on Fri, 26 Jan 2018 09:01 | Permalink

Nearly half a million Americans suffered from Clostridium difficile infections in a single year

Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) caused almost half a million infections among patients in the United States in a single year, according to a study released today by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Approximately 29,000 patients died within 30 days of the initial diagnosis of C. difficile.  Of those, about 15,000 deaths were estimated to be directly attributable to C. difficile infections, making C. difficile a very important cause of infectious disease death in the United States.  More than 80 percent of the deaths associated with C. difficile occurred among Americans aged 65 years or older. C. difficile causes an inflammation of the colon and deadly diarrhea.

https://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2015/p0225-clostridium-difficile.html

Posted by editor on Fri, 26 Jan 2018 09:01 | Permalink

Robot CATS to be used to help elderly people with tasks and reminders

The US project, dubbed ARIES - Affordable Robotic Intelligence for Elderly Support – aims to develop artificially intelligent cats and dogs that can aid older people.

A toy company has been granted money to develop robotic cats for the elderly which can help with tasks and reminders.

Toy giant Hasbro and the prestigious Brown University, Rhode Island, have secured a $1m science grant to fund research and development to add artificial intelligence features to their 'Joy for All' pets.

The US project, dubbed ARIES - Affordable Robotic Intelligence for Elderly Support – aims to develop artificially intelligent cats and dogs that can aid older people, people with mild dementia remember what they otherwise might forget.

https://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/robot-cats-used-help-elderly-11725043

Posted by editor on Mon, 22 Jan 2018 11:01 | Permalink

Everything You Should Know About Designing a Home for Aging in Place

Senior citizens make up the country's fastest-growing population, according to the latest U.S. census results. They’re outpacing the growth of the general population at a rate of 15.1 percent to 9.7 percent, and the total number of individuals over 65 is projected to nearly double before 2050.

In anticipation of this trend’s impact, New York City’s Department for the Aging released an Aging in Place Guide in 2016 outlining how simple design choices can allow seniors to safely live independently for longer. “The guide is part of an effort to make NYC a better place to grow older,” said Zenovia Earle, director of public affairs for the DFTA, in reference to the city’s broader-reaching age-friendly NYC initiative.

https://www.architecturaldigest.com/story/aging-in-place-guide

Posted by editor on Mon, 22 Jan 2018 11:01 | Permalink

 
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