Top 10 Ways to Help Seniors to Beat the Heat

As spring blossoms and the summer heats up, many of our nation's senior citizens will begin to leave their homes to take advantage of the sun and warm weather. Although many would agree that "age is a state of mind," the summer months bring with them risks to susceptible elderly populations that have been home bound during the winter months.

That's why Visiting Angels, the nation's leading at-home non-medical assisted living service provider, has created the following tips to help seniors prepare for the sweltering conditions and the rigors of living through the upcoming heat waves.

http://myemail.constantcontact.com/Top-10-Ways-to-Help-Seniors-Beat-the-Heat.html?soid=1121631882093&aid=3Ch99ahCNRI

Posted by editor on Fri, 17 Jun 2016 14:06 | Permalink

Gardner Capital Development to Develop Affordable Senior Housing Community

PHOENIX, June 15, 2016 /PRNewswire/ -- Gardner Capital Development has been awarded a reservation of Low Income Housing Tax Credits from the Arizona Department of Housing to develop the El Caro Senior Residences, an $18 million affordable senior housing project consisting of 102 energy-efficient one- and two-bedroom apartments. The site is located one-half mile from the Metro Light Rail Station at the intersection of 19th and Northern avenues.

Construction of the development, named after the former golf course located at the site, is anticipated to begin in the first quarter of 2017, with completion expected 15 months after construction begins. All units will be leased to seniors earning generally between $18,000 and $34,000 in household income, with a mix of apartments set aside at 40-60 percent of Metro Phoenix median income. Twenty-five percent of the units will be reserved for seniors or family members with developmental disabilities. Gardner Capital Development will serve as the project lead developer. Reid Butler and Scott Davis will serve as additional advisors to the project. The United Cerebral Palsy Association of Central Arizona will provide supportive services for the housing community when completed.

http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/gardner-capital-development-to-develop-affordable-senior-housing-community-300284535.html

Posted by editor on Fri, 17 Jun 2016 14:06 | Permalink

New aged care centre on the cards for Silkstone

A NEW high density aged care facility has been proposed for a vacant block among houses at Silkstone.

Aspire Aged Care, a new player in the local aged care industry, lodged its application with Ipswich City Council this month for a 132 unit development covering more than 11,000 sq m at Heather St.

If approved, the two-storey precinct with six buildings surrounding a central community centre, would employee 12 full time staff and operate 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

http://www.qt.com.au/news/new-aged-care-centre-cards-silkstone/3045360/

Posted by editor on Fri, 17 Jun 2016 14:06 | Permalink

Hoffman Senior Living offering quality home-like setting

Flowery Branch personal care home now open

John and Amy Hoffman have been working in the patient care field for years.

He is a physical therapist who has worked in hospitals and in home care. She is an occupational therapist. They are now bringing that experience in rehabilitation together with their desire to fill a void in personal care in the Flowery Branch area.

http://www.gainesvilletimes.com/section/6/article/117270/

Posted by editor on Mon, 06 Jun 2016 14:06 | Permalink

Keep Your Smart Home Safe From Hackers

Is your refrigerator spying on you? Probably not. But online-security experts caution that homes with “smart” technology—thermostats, security cameras, lights and appliances that connect to the Internet—are vulnerable to being hacked.

In a recent survey of 4,065 adults in the U.S., real-estate brokerage Coldwell Banker Real Estate found that 45% of respondents own smart-home technology or plan to invest in it this year. Yet only recently has security become a priority. While there have been few reported incidents, online-security experts expect smart-home hacking to increase. Luxury homeowners—often early adopters of technology, executives with access to corporate data or simply wealthy individuals—can be appealing targets.

The risks range from relatively harmless (pranksters cranking up the heat) to outright criminal (disabling security cameras to orchestrate a break-in). One of the biggest dangers is that poorly secured smart-home devices could be used as a “backdoor” to gain access to more sensitive information.

http://www.msn.com/en-us/money/technologyinvesting/keep-your-smart-home-safe-from-hackers/ar-BBt9F0U

Posted by editor on Mon, 06 Jun 2016 14:06 | Permalink

How Tai Chi Can Help Conquer Fear of Falling as We Age

The odds of a bone-shattering fall increase with age, as muscles grow weak and vision fades.

Yet seniors who fear falling are at higher risk of falling, research shows, even if they have never taken a spill before. Those most fearful of falling may decide to avoid risk by avoiding activity—and then grow weaker and more likely to fall as a result.

“It can become this vicious cycle,” said Susan Friedman, a geriatrician at the University of Rochester Medical Center who studies falls and hip fractures among the elderly. Bad falls send about 250,000 seniors to the hospital each year for hip fractures that can leave them depressed and increasingly frail, even after extensive physical therapy.

http://www.wsj.com/articles/how-tai-chi-can-help-conquer-fear-of-falling-as-we-age-1464023456

Posted by editor on Mon, 06 Jun 2016 14:06 | Permalink

To Stay in their Communities, Seniors First Need A Place To Live

Sometimes, you just have to say what is crashingly obvious. And when it comes to older adults aging at home, here it is: If seniors are going to avoid a nursing home, they need a safe, affordable alternative. Without one, they may die prematurely. And even if they live, they will almost surely need institutional care, which may be a bad alternative for them and, if they are poor, will cost the government a small fortune.  In short, you can’t age in place without a “place.”

In a new report released this week, called Healthy Aging Begins at Home, the Bipartisan Policy Center made 30 recommendations for how government can improve access to quality housing for seniors. They include enhanced housing subsidy programs for low-income seniors, modest steps aimed at integrating housing with health care and supportive services, and encouraging greater use of technology to improve care at home.

http://www.forbes.com/sites/howardgleckman/2016/05/27/to-stay-in-their-communities-seniors-first-need-a-place-to-live/#66dc387740ae

Posted by editor on Mon, 06 Jun 2016 14:06 | Permalink

'Care-bots' for the elderly are dangerous, warns artificial intelligence professor

Computer companions for elderly people are ‘emotionally dangerous’ and will never be good enough to take the place of real human contact, an artificial intelligence expert has warned.

In December the University of Singapore introduced ‘Nadine’ the world’s most lifelike robot whose creators say will eventually provide childcare and offer friendship to lonely pensioners. More basic ‘care-bots’ which simply show an image of a computerised face are already on the market for as little as £3,000.

But Maggie Boden, professor of Cognitive Science at the University of Sussex, warned that machines would never be able to understand abstract ideas such as loyalty or hurt.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/2016/05/30/care-bots-for-the-elderly-are-dangerous-warns-artificial-intelli/

Posted by editor on Mon, 06 Jun 2016 14:06 | Permalink

Aging in Place

When I asked the other three members of my walking group, all of whom are in their mid to upper 70s, whether they had any concerns about future living arrangements, they each said they had none despite the fact that, like me, they live in multistory private homes without elevators and, in two cases, without bathrooms on every floor.

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2016/05/02/aging-in-place/?_r=0

Posted by editor on Sun, 29 May 2016 11:05 | Permalink

Thriving at Age 70 and Beyond

A recently published book, “70Candles! Women Thriving in Their 8th Decade,” inspired me to take a closer look at how I’m doing as I approach 75 and how I might make the most of the years to come. It would be a good idea for women in my age cohort to do likewise. With a quarter of American women age 65 expected to live into their 90s, there could be quite a few years to think about.

It’s not the first time I’ve considered the implications of longevity. When one of my grandsons at age 8 asked, “Grandma, will you still be alive when I get married?” I replied, “I certainly hope so. I want to dance at your wedding.” But I followed up with a suggestion that he marry young!

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2016/04/25/thriving-at-age-70-and-beyond/?_r=0

 

Posted by editor on Sun, 29 May 2016 11:05 | Permalink

 
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