Aging in Place

When I asked the other three members of my walking group, all of whom are in their mid to upper 70s, whether they had any concerns about future living arrangements, they each said they had none despite the fact that, like me, they live in multistory private homes without elevators and, in two cases, without bathrooms on every floor.

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2016/05/02/aging-in-place/?_r=0

Posted by editor on Sun, 29 May 2016 11:05 | Permalink

Thriving at Age 70 and Beyond

A recently published book, “70Candles! Women Thriving in Their 8th Decade,” inspired me to take a closer look at how I’m doing as I approach 75 and how I might make the most of the years to come. It would be a good idea for women in my age cohort to do likewise. With a quarter of American women age 65 expected to live into their 90s, there could be quite a few years to think about.

It’s not the first time I’ve considered the implications of longevity. When one of my grandsons at age 8 asked, “Grandma, will you still be alive when I get married?” I replied, “I certainly hope so. I want to dance at your wedding.” But I followed up with a suggestion that he marry young!

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2016/04/25/thriving-at-age-70-and-beyond/?_r=0

 

Posted by editor on Sun, 29 May 2016 11:05 | Permalink

Home is where your heart is, whatever your age

Our homes have a significant impact on our wellbeing and our ability to live our lives the way we want to. For those aged 65 and over, 80% would like to stay where they are and 85% plan to remain in their neighbourhoods for a number of years

http://www.ageing-better.org.uk/news/home-heart-whatever-age/

 

Posted by editor on Sun, 29 May 2016 11:05 | Permalink

A Lesson on Competition in Aged Care Services

More competition in the delivery of human services, as recommended by the Harper Inquiry, is likely to increase the variety of services available, reduce the price of services and may encourage innovation. However, when it comes to aged care sector, competition may not necessarily result in better care, due to market failures.

http://www.economywatch.com/features/A-Lesson-on-Competition-in-Aged-Care-Services0527.html

Posted by editor on Sun, 29 May 2016 11:05 | Permalink

The New 65 is not the Old 65

The populations of most countries of the world are aging, prompting a deluge of news stories about slower economic growth, reduced labor force participation, looming pension crises, exploding health care costs and the reduced productivity and cognitive functioning of the elderly.

Turning 65 in 2016 doesn’t mean the same thing as hitting 65 in 1916. Therefore, instead of relying on the old-age dependency ratio to figure out the impact of aging, we propose using a series of new measures that take changes in life expectancy, labor participation and health spending into account. When you consider these new realities, the picture looks a lot brighter.

http://www.economywatch.com/features/The-New-65-is-not-the-Old-650304.html

Posted by editor on Sun, 29 May 2016 11:05 | Permalink

New local program assists senior citizens with driving

Do you know if your parent or grandparent is still safe on the road, or if it's time for them to give up the keys? Home Instead Senior Care has launched a free program to help with this decision.

Home Instead, a network of franchise offices that provide in-home care services to seniors, found that 95 percent of drivers 70 and older who responded to a recent survey have not talked to their loved ones about driving, officials said in a news release. Nearly one-third said that a recommendation from family or friends that they transition from driving would make them reconsider driving.

http://www.dailypress.com/health/dp-fea-health-notes-0528-20160527-story.html

Posted by editor on Sun, 29 May 2016 11:05 | Permalink

More competition may not be the answer to reforming the aged care system

More competition in the delivery of human services, as recommended by the Harper Inquiry, is likely to increase the variety of services available, reduce the price of services and may encourage innovation. However, when it comes to aged care sector, competition may not necessarily result in better care, due to market failures.

The Harper Inquiry, which was tasked with ‘kick starting’ the process of balancing competition, argued that human services should also be subject to competition. However simply restructuring the sector to create competition will not necessarily deliver efficiency or the type of service that the community requires.

https://theconversation.com/more-competition-may-not-be-the-answer-to-reforming-the-aged-care-system-58155

Posted by editor on Sun, 29 May 2016 11:05 | Permalink

Aging-in-Place Wildly Popular, Home Health Aides Less So

The vast majority of Americans would prefer to receive senior care in a home setting, but that doesn’t mean they see professional home health aides as the ideal caregivers.

When asked where they would prefer to receive ongoing care should they need it, 77% of people said their own home, according to survey findings released Friday by The Associated Press and independent research organization NORC at the University of Chicago. A senior community was the runner-up preference, but was chosen by only 11% of respondents. The survey polled nearly 1,700 Americans aged 40 and older, and took place between Feb. 18 and April 9 of this year.

http://homehealthcarenews.com/2016/05/aging-in-place-wildly-popular-home-health-aides-less-so/

Posted by editor on Sun, 29 May 2016 11:05 | Permalink

4 Family Caregiver Stress Busters

First, Dad needed help monitoring his daily medications.  Soon, he needed regular at-home care.  If you are taking care of elderly parents, you understand the tough sacrifices and rewards of helping your aging parent with daily routines such as bathing, cooking, washing laundry, or making medical and financial decisions.

Yet, without realizing it, your efforts to comfort and support your elderly parents may be eroding your own health with an elevated risk of high blood pressure, stroke, diabetes, and anxiety.  Stress from caring for an aging loved one also can increase the likelihood of headaches, disruptive sleep, and depression.

http://caregivingcompanion.com/4-family-caregiver-stress-busters-help-for-senior-caregivers-eldercare-at-home/

Posted by editor on Sun, 29 May 2016 11:05 | Permalink

Empty-Nest Conundrum: To Stay Put or Downsize When Kids Fly?

My parents are thrilled to live in the house where my sisters and I grew up. I enjoy visiting them and look forward to a time when my kids, as grownups, will come home to enjoy a place that’s familiar and inviting. But where will that be? I’ve started to wonder.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/john-f-sweeney/empty-nest-conundrum-to-stay-put-or-downsize-when-kids-fly_b_9876470.html

Posted by editor on Sat, 21 May 2016 13:05 | Permalink

 
NEWSLETTER SIGN UP