Students retire to new homes, live among senior citizens

GRAND RAPIDS - Three Western Michigan University graduate students moved into their on-campus apartments at the beginning of the fall semester.

The campus on which they are living, though, is not Western Michigan’s. And their neighbors are not college students — at least they have not been for a long time.

Colett Chapp, Corey Youngs and Lori Johnson are about a third of the way through the 19 months they will spend alongside 80 senior citizens in a Grand Rapids retirement community as part of what is believed to be one of the first such research projects of its kind in the U.S.

http://www.lansingstatejournal.com/story/news/local/michigan/2017/02/24/students-retire-homes-senior-citizens-study/98356972/

Posted by editor on Mon, 27 Feb 2017 11:02 | Permalink

Senior living partners rolling out home care non-profit

A trio of senior care providers have formed a joint venture to provide home care to seniors throughout West Michigan.

Holland Home, Resthaven and Clark said today they’re partnering to launch Atrio Home Care.

Terms of the venture were not disclosed.

Based in Grand Rapids and Holland, Atrio expects to serve more than 3,000 seniors and their families in Kent, Ottawa, Allegan, Barry, Ionia and Montcalm counties in the coming year.

The new nonprofit will employ 225 nurses, therapists, aides and other clinicians to deliver a broad range of skilled and private duty services. The organization expects to add positions in both Grand Rapids and Holland.

http://www.grbj.com/articles/87290-senior-living-partners-rolling-out-home-care-nonprofit

Posted by editor on Mon, 27 Feb 2017 11:02 | Permalink

Considering home care as an alternative to aged care

As more of us want to live in homes for longer, there are more people turning to alternatives to liviMore of us are looking for alternatives that will allow us to live in our homes well into our later years instead of moving into an aged care facility.

One of those alternatives which is becoming popular is home care, and with a change of rules set to give you more control over your care, it’s set to become even more popular.

Under the current home care system, the government assigns you to a home care provider.

But on February 27, the system is set to change.

The changes will allow you to choose your own qualified home care provider or you can choose your own qualified home carer directly.

You might be wondering what home care is?

https://startsat60.com/property/considering-home-care-as-an-alternative-to-aged-care

Posted by editor on Mon, 27 Feb 2017 11:02 | Permalink

Hospitals forging patient experience of the future with voice AI technologies

Commonwealth Care Alliance and Penn Medicine are already putting Amazon Alexa to work in early-stage projects that promise to reshape the patient experience.

Artificial intelligence voice technologies are on the verge of changing — not to be overzealous here — but just about everything.

We’ve all witnessed how the smartphone has had an impact on society and, similarly, voice technologies are poised to effectively and strategically enchant the human psyche to accept them as humanlike companions.

And healthcare is ripe for artificial intelligence — perhaps even more than other industries when it comes to voice-interaction AI — because of the potential for improving care delivery, optimizing processes and improving the patient experience.

“We’re on the cusp of voice systems and voice learning tools that can tailor individualized care,” said John Loughnane, MD, chief of clinical innovation at Commonwealth Care Alliance.

http://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/hospitals-forging-patient-experience-future-voice-ai-technologies

Posted by editor on Mon, 27 Feb 2017 11:02 | Permalink

No place to call home: for middle-class seniors aging in place, a dilemma

ITHACA, N.Y.—Forty-two years ago, David and Joan Brumberg traveled to Ithaca from their home in Geneva to have dinner at Moosewood Restaurant for the first time.

Joan, who had visited Ithaca several times before, loved the city. She thought that Ithaca was “more liberal and more sophisticated, with better restaurants” than Geneva. “It wasn’t like it is now,” Joan said, “but it was just culturally richer.”

On the ride home after dinner, Joan turned to David. “I want to move to Ithaca,” Joan told him. Two years later, in 1977, they moved into a home in the Belle Sherman neighborhood, where they raised their son.

https://ithacavoice.com/2017/02/no-place-call-home-middle-class-seniors-aging-place-dilemma/

Posted by editor on Mon, 27 Feb 2017 11:02 | Permalink

Hidden carers: the sixty-somethings looking after parents and grandchildren

Beverley works full-time. She does her grandchildren’s school run every morning, and spends one evening a week and every Saturday with her 85-year-old mother, who lives alone and is increasingly frail.

“This isn’t how I pictured being 60. I do think, gosh, when will I be allowed to get old myself?” Beverley said. “I thought I’d be slowing down now and shedding my responsibilities, but I’m going to be juggling work and caring for many years to come – with the caring lasting well past retirement age.”

Beverley is part of the sandwich generation – people who care for ageing parents while supporting their children. When the term was coined, it generally referred to people in their 30s and 40s. Now the sandwich generation has grown older and deeper. People in their 50s, 60s and 70s are caring for their elderly parents, needy adult children and lively grandchildren. The sandwich has become a triple.

https://www.theguardian.com/membership/2017/feb/13/new-retirement-ageing-responsibility-carers-parents-children-care-crisis

Posted by editor on Wed, 15 Feb 2017 10:02 | Permalink

How the Healthcare System Brought This Expert to Her Knees

Two weeks ago today my dad called and said his buddy, Roger, up here in Minneapolis was just diagnosed with a terminal brain tumor, was in the hospital and my dad asked me if I could help. Roger has no living family and very few (if any true) friends other than my parents. Unfortunately for Roger, my parents left Minneapolis for Phoenix at the end of November and at that time Roger was fine, he said he had been feeling great. After a sudden incident a couple of weeks ago, he found himself half-conscious on the floor in his condo. Medics broke his door down and he was admitted to a local hospital. Roger met the definition of a vulnerable adult – he had no one to fend for him and he was unable to communicate well for the first week in the hospital.

https://kristencedsall.wordpress.com/2017/02/13/how-the-healthcare-system-brought-this-expert-to-her-knees/

Posted by editor on Wed, 15 Feb 2017 10:02 | Permalink

90-year-old Napa ombudsman watches over her peers in care homes

To be one of them is to know them – and a longtime monitor of Napa County’s nursing and senior-care homes is helping to look after men and women her own age.

Less than two weeks from her 91st birthday, Vera Fields has lived through a career in nursing that has put her in charge of everything from industrial nursing to a hospital surgery unit to the care of patients in their own homes. But her current role, the one she has fulfilled for 16 years, may touch more people than the others: as a member of the county’s ombudsman office looking after elderly Napans housed in long-term care centers in the valley.

http://napavalleyregister.com/news/local/year-old-napa-ombudsman-watches-over-her-peers-in-care/article_5f265ef7-11bb-5779-a081-ac5bcb87ede3.html

Posted by editor on Wed, 15 Feb 2017 10:02 | Permalink

How aged care facilities are fighting back against depression

Mental health is becoming a real talking point about aged care, and here's how one facility is addressing the issue.

BallyCara is using activities such as art therapy to combat depression amongst residents.

In recent weeks there has been a lot of talk about mental health in aged care facilities.

As you might have read, the Council on the Ageing is lobbying the Federal Government to change a Medicare rule which doesn’t recognise aged care residents as patients in the community.

The rule prevents a lot of older Australians from being able to access mental health treatments for conditions such as anxiety and depression.

https://startsat60.com/property/how-aged-care-facilities-are-fighting-back-against-depression

Posted by editor on Wed, 15 Feb 2017 10:02 | Permalink

How To Create A Safe 'Aging-In-Place' Home

My husband and I are thinking about making some modifications to our home so we can remain living there for as long as possible. Can you recommend some good resources that can help us with aging-in-place ideas.

Many retirees, like you and your husband, want to stay living in their own house for as long as possible. But being able to do so will depend on how easy it is to maneuver your home as you get older. Here are some helpful resources you can turn to, to get an idea of the different types of features and improvements you can make that will make your house safer and more convenient as you grow older.

http://www.qgazette.com/news/2017-02-01/Seniors

Posted by editor on Mon, 13 Feb 2017 11:02 | Permalink

 
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