4 important retirement account changes for 2016

As we start the second month of the year, it may be time to re-examine and update your existing retirement-plan strategies if you haven't already. With a few recent changes made to retirement account rules this year you may be eligible for some new financial opportunities.

http://www.marketwatch.com/story/4-important-retirement-account-changes-for-2016-2016-02-05

Posted by editor on Mon, 15 Feb 2016 10:02 | Permalink

Finding a Drug for Healthy Aging

Given their druthers, most people would opt for a long and healthy life. Few relish the idea of spending years, even decades, incapacitated by illness, dependent on caregivers and unable to enjoy the people, places and activities that make life worth living.

In 1980, Dr. James F. Fries, a Stanford University physician who studied chronic disease and aging, proposed that a “compression of morbidity” would enable most people to remain healthy until a certain age, perhaps 85, then die naturally or after only a brief illness.

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2016/02/01/pursuing-the-dream-of-healthy-aging/?ref=health&_r=1

Posted by editor on Mon, 15 Feb 2016 10:02 | Permalink

4 Ways to Beat the Winter Blues

When the sun wakes up late and slips away before the workday ends, when many a day is dark and gray, when it’s Groundhog Day and even an early spring seems far away, many large, hairy mammals — Punxsutawney Phil, included — choose to hibernate. But not us!

We slog through, knowing that the passage of time will bring brighter days ahead. But we can do more than wait it out. Here are four easy ways to beat the winter blues and create a little sunshine of your own…

http://www.nextavenue.org/4-ways-to-beat-the-winter-blues/

Posted by editor on Mon, 15 Feb 2016 10:02 | Permalink

Love and ageing in the classics

Given the position that elders hold in our society, be it as parents or teachers or political leaders, you would imagine that, traditionally, we do not participate in the cult of the young and lovely. In the stories that we valorize and tell over and over again, age takes precedence over beauty, wisdom is more important than energy. But despite the apparent respect we have for older people, we don’t have many stories about how people age in love and in togetherness or how they adjust to a world that changes around them. Our love stories, Nala and Damayanti, Savitri and Satyavan, Rama and Sita, are all about young people, their love in its first rosy flush, their romance in its first delicate bloom. Heer-Ranjha, Laila-Majnu are interrupted by death before they can be reunited and grow old together. They remain forever young, forever in love.

http://www.livemint.com/Leisure/xHJY3l84fto41nyUf63GCP/Love-and-ageing-in-the-classics.html

Posted by editor on Mon, 15 Feb 2016 10:02 | Permalink

High drug prices mean you can't afford your medications? There's help

Patients suffering from painful, sometimes life-threatening diseases often find the struggles hardly end when the treatments are over.

Co-payments and other out-of-pocket costs for drugs, on top of the bills for the uncovered portion of doctor and hospital visits, can linger for months or years, especially for chronic conditions such as heart disease and cancer.

http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/personalfinance/2016/02/02/high-drug-prices-help-afford-medications/79201120/#

Posted by editor on Mon, 15 Feb 2016 10:02 | Permalink

Benzodiazepines Do Not Directly Increase Dementia Risk, Still Not Advised for Elderly

Benzodiazepines are a common class of medication used for anxiety and sleep problems. New research finds that although the drugs do not increase the risk of dementia, health professionals are advised to avoid their use in older adults.

Common benzodiazepines are clonazepam (Klonopin), lorazepam (Ativan), diazepam (Valium), and alprazolam (Xanax).

Although research published in the British Medical Journal (BMJ) did not find a cause and effect increased dementia risk, the use of benzodiazepines among older adults may lead to adverse health outcomes.

Benzodiazepines are widely prescribed among older adults to manage sleep, anxiety, and depressive disorders. The new study sought to resolve conflicting findings on whether benzodiazepines could increase risk of dementia.

http://psychcentral.com/news/2016/02/08/benzodiazepines-do-not-directly-increase-dementia-risk-still-not-advised-for-elderly/98811.html

Posted by editor on Mon, 15 Feb 2016 10:02 | Permalink

'It's a lifesaver for people my age:'

How 9 small towns are leading the way to help elders live at home

This is the first in a monthly, yearlong series called Age of Opportunity about Maine people, organizations, towns and businesses that are helping keep older residents safe, healthy and happy. These innovators present ideas worth spreading.

Next month Maine Focus will feature Maine businesses that have supported older workers by getting creative about hiring, retraining or retaining employees. Send us names of businesses and information about what they’re doing to meet the needs of their older workers.

http://external.bangordailynews.com/projects/2015/01/elders-at-home/?v3#.VrFyVk1umHs

Posted by editor on Mon, 08 Feb 2016 10:02 | Permalink

 
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